Want to Keep Music in Sync Between Your Android and iOS Devices? Try Rdio

As you all know, I am primarily an iOS user who is fliriting with a  Galaxy Nexus  for the time being. The more I use the the Nexus, the more I like it. Will it one day replace my  iPhone ? It's way too early for me to make that claim. Currently, I am using both devices daily. My first couple of attempts at this have not been all that successful. But this time around, the  Android Market  is mature enough that many of my beloved iPhone apps can be installed on my Android device as well. Many of my favorite apps such as  Lose It!   (see mini review here)  are multiplatform and stay synced between both devices. But there are many aspects of iOS that don't play well with Android and one of those road blocks is  iCloud . I will have another post in the near future that will detail the pains of keeping contacts, calendars and todos in sync between platforms, but this post is about iCloud and how it relates to music.  
 With iCloud, I am able to download and listen to all my iTunes purchases in my iTunes library on my iPhone and iPad. Even when I purchase a song on my Mac, iPhone or iPad, that same song will be downloaded to my other devices. But you know where it's not going to go? That's right. You won't see it automatically installed on my Android smartphone or tablet. I can't even get access to my iTunes library from an Android phone. Yes, there are some ways to do some syncing using apps liked  doubleTwist  but it is not ahem.. an "Apple like experience".   
  
 But I have found an easy solution for this.  Rdio  is a music subscription service that is multi-platform. I have it installed on all my mobile devices including the iPhone, iPad and Galaxy Nexus. To make this work for you and get the most out of the app, you will want to download the desktop client. It will match your iTunes library with it's massive database of music. Once you do that, you will immediately have that music accessible to you in your Rdio collection on the mobile app. You can download any of these songs to your devices for offline play as well. The subscription to Rdio services does run you right at $10 a month but to have most all your music with you at all times on whichever device you decide to pick up and use makes it worth it to me. But that's not all you get. Unlike iCloud, which is  just  access to your iTunes library, Rdio gives you access to their entire music database for no additional cost. And yes, you can even listen and download songs you don't own to your device. You only lose the music when you terminate the subscription to the service. You can also subscribe to other's custom playlists or make and share your own. This is a full featured app and it continues to get better all the time.  
 So eliminate the headaches of trying to keep all your devices in sync and trying to make Apple and Google play nice together. Use Rdio. Let me know what you think or if you prefer another method for managing music on multiple platforms, please comment below. 

As you all know, I am primarily an iOS user who is fliriting with a Galaxy Nexus for the time being. The more I use the the Nexus, the more I like it. Will it one day replace my iPhone? It's way too early for me to make that claim. Currently, I am using both devices daily. My first couple of attempts at this have not been all that successful. But this time around, the Android Market is mature enough that many of my beloved iPhone apps can be installed on my Android device as well. Many of my favorite apps such as Lose It! (see mini review here) are multiplatform and stay synced between both devices. But there are many aspects of iOS that don't play well with Android and one of those road blocks is iCloud. I will have another post in the near future that will detail the pains of keeping contacts, calendars and todos in sync between platforms, but this post is about iCloud and how it relates to music. 

With iCloud, I am able to download and listen to all my iTunes purchases in my iTunes library on my iPhone and iPad. Even when I purchase a song on my Mac, iPhone or iPad, that same song will be downloaded to my other devices. But you know where it's not going to go? That's right. You won't see it automatically installed on my Android smartphone or tablet. I can't even get access to my iTunes library from an Android phone. Yes, there are some ways to do some syncing using apps liked doubleTwist but it is not ahem.. an "Apple like experience".  

But I have found an easy solution for this. Rdio is a music subscription service that is multi-platform. I have it installed on all my mobile devices including the iPhone, iPad and Galaxy Nexus. To make this work for you and get the most out of the app, you will want to download the desktop client. It will match your iTunes library with it's massive database of music. Once you do that, you will immediately have that music accessible to you in your Rdio collection on the mobile app. You can download any of these songs to your devices for offline play as well. The subscription to Rdio services does run you right at $10 a month but to have most all your music with you at all times on whichever device you decide to pick up and use makes it worth it to me. But that's not all you get. Unlike iCloud, which is just access to your iTunes library, Rdio gives you access to their entire music database for no additional cost. And yes, you can even listen and download songs you don't own to your device. You only lose the music when you terminate the subscription to the service. You can also subscribe to other's custom playlists or make and share your own. This is a full featured app and it continues to get better all the time. 

So eliminate the headaches of trying to keep all your devices in sync and trying to make Apple and Google play nice together. Use Rdio. Let me know what you think or if you prefer another method for managing music on multiple platforms, please comment below.