An androidXperience - The Galaxy Note 2 - Part 4 - Notifications (They Can Do More Than Just Notify!)

This is the 4th part in a series of posts reviewing the  Galaxy Note 2  from the view of a longtime  iPhone  user. In this brief blog piece, I break down the way the two phones handle notifications.  
 The iPhone's built in Notifcation Center hasn't even scratched the surface with what the mobile OS is capable of. In  iOS 5.0 , Apple finally realized that with the massive amounts of apps people are downloading to their devices, a better method was desperately needed to handle the barrage of blue bubble popups that plagued us iPhone users as we tried to enjoy our devices. The notifications were obtrusive and annoying and there was no history given to go back and look at the messages when you decided at the time to dismiss them.  
  Notification Center for iOS  was a much needed step in the right direction. But more is needed. A weather widget, a stock widget, a social network status updater and a list of notifications are all important and we want them easily accessible. But can more me done? I believe that answer is a resounding "Yes!" and  Android's Jelly Bean  combined with some  TouchWiz  tweaks available on  Samsung's  latest offering confirm that much more is possible and welcome for that matter.  
  
 Take a side by side look at the two devices. They both provide information. But the biggest difference? Is how you interact with the notifications. Where on iOS, you can simply tap on an "x" to dismiss a notification, or tap on one and be taken to the application represented by that notification, The Galaxy Note 2 provides a way for you to actually interact with a notification and in many instances, perform simple tasks without ever leaving the notification shade. Throw in some key toggles for performing basic phone functions, controls for your favorite music applications or simply the ability to expand or reply to a message, email or tweet and the Notification Center becomes a truly powerful and streamlined tool for handling the simple things that should be effortless and unitrusive to the use and user of the device. I hope Apple takes "Note" here (pun intended) and "borrows" some more ideas from a serious competitor.  
   
  

This is the 4th part in a series of posts reviewing the Galaxy Note 2 from the view of a longtime iPhone user. In this brief blog piece, I break down the way the two phones handle notifications. 

The iPhone's built in Notifcation Center hasn't even scratched the surface with what the mobile OS is capable of. In iOS 5.0, Apple finally realized that with the massive amounts of apps people are downloading to their devices, a better method was desperately needed to handle the barrage of blue bubble popups that plagued us iPhone users as we tried to enjoy our devices. The notifications were obtrusive and annoying and there was no history given to go back and look at the messages when you decided at the time to dismiss them. 

Notification Center for iOS was a much needed step in the right direction. But more is needed. A weather widget, a stock widget, a social network status updater and a list of notifications are all important and we want them easily accessible. But can more me done? I believe that answer is a resounding "Yes!" and Android's Jelly Bean combined with some TouchWiz tweaks available on Samsung's latest offering confirm that much more is possible and welcome for that matter. 

Take a side by side look at the two devices. They both provide information. But the biggest difference? Is how you interact with the notifications. Where on iOS, you can simply tap on an "x" to dismiss a notification, or tap on one and be taken to the application represented by that notification, The Galaxy Note 2 provides a way for you to actually interact with a notification and in many instances, perform simple tasks without ever leaving the notification shade. Throw in some key toggles for performing basic phone functions, controls for your favorite music applications or simply the ability to expand or reply to a message, email or tweet and the Notification Center becomes a truly powerful and streamlined tool for handling the simple things that should be effortless and unitrusive to the use and user of the device. I hope Apple takes "Note" here (pun intended) and "borrows" some more ideas from a serious competitor.